Recreational dives in Kefalonia

Recreational dives in Kefalonia

Activity Snapshot

  • Sport level: Advanced
  • Spoken languages: English, Greek
  • Fitness level: Advanced
  • Duration: 3 hrs
  • Cancellation policy: 
    super flexibleFREE cancellation with full refund up to 24 hours before the start of the activity.
  • Meeting point:
    Blue Manta Diving centre, Tara Beach, Skala 280 86, Greece
  • Opening seasons:

Activity description

 Kefalonia is a true paradise for scuba diving, and every scuba diver knows that. Blue Manta diving centre and its experienced instructors organise on a daily basis recreational dives for those who wish to explore the island underwater. Caves, walls, wrecks and many dives to leave you awed. 

The diving spots

1)HMS Perseus

Perhaps the top WW II wreck dive in Mediterranean, British Overseas
Patrol submarine HMS/M Perseus, (N36) lies virtually intact on the
sandy bottom, at 52 meters depth, about a mile off the south coast of
Kefalonia.

Perseus submarine is not only among the most impressive wreck dives a
diver can experience, but has an amazing history as well. The vessel
was on combat patrol in December 1941, and while cruising at the
surface at night hit an Italian naval mine and sunk. From the crew of
59 only one, the Royal Navy leading stoker John Capes managed a
daredevil escape from a depth no one has attempted before, swam his
way to Katelios and with the aid of locals escaped capture from
Italian and German occupation forces and finally transferred in
Turkey. While legendary in Royal Navy, almost nobody believed his
adventure until in 1997 a team of Greek divers located the submarine
and verified details of his described escape.

The divers approaching the submarine encounter a magnificent vessel 88
meters long, with a large conning tower, the ship’s gun and the rear
hutch still open indicating the escape route of John Capes, while a
look in the interior is possible. Among other things, the torpedo
tubes and the ship’s propellers and rudder are visible.

The submarine is practically an artificial reef and colorful sponges,
small fish and aquatic creatures take shelter here, while predators
like amberjacks and snappers are frequent visitors.

The average depth or the dive is 40 m, while the max is 50, reserving
the submarine for experienced and technical divers. The visibility is
usually greater than 25m while temperature ranges between 18-24 C in
summer months, depending on depth. Occasionally there may be strong
currents close to the surface. Boat ride duration 15′.


2) Kakava Amphora Yard

“Kakava” is an extended ancient wrecks site, once believed to be a
submerged village. There is an abundance of amphorae, primarily from
Roman era wrecks with at least one from 2nd century BC. Around the
reef more evidence of ancient to modern day wrecks are present, such
as steel ship parts and huge coal pieces, marking the resting place of
an unknown steamboat. Schools of damselfish hover against the current
attracting predators such as snappers, Mediterranean barracudas and
amberjacks. Parrotfish, brown meagres, groupers and octopuses occupy
every recess and crevice along the reef. The dive site is situated
between the two main nesting beaches for Loggerhead sea turtles around
Kefalonia “Kaminia” and “Skala”, so chances to catch sight of one
looking for her next meal, are quite high.

The average depth or the dive is 8 m, while the max is 12 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 22-27 °C
in summer months. Occasionally a weak surface current may be
encountered. Boat ride duration 6′.

3)Tilemachos' Cave

Out of the seagrass meadows (“Posidonia oceanica”) a lone reef rises,
a death trap to ancient vessels passing through the area. At least 2
of those wooden merchant ships once roaming the Mediterranean, have
found their final resting place here, scattering their ballast stones,
lead and bronze parts of their hull and rigging and scores of amphorae
– their primary cargo, proving the area a puzzle to seamen through the
ages.

On the underside of a long shallow rocky ridge, a small yet impressive
underwater cave awaits to be explored. The dark chamber in the rock
features two side-openings and one on the top acting as a skylight
shedding ample light into the interior, rewarding the daring diver
with spectacular views. Also a variety of fish and quite often
Loggerhead sea turtles are frequent visitors to the site.

The average depth or the dive is 7 m, while the max is 12 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 22-27 °C
in summer months. Occasionally a weak surface current may be
encountered. Boat ride duration 5′.


4) Sponge Walls

There is no better spot for macro photographers to capture all the
amazing micro flora and fauna of the Mediterranean. On the
under-the-surface portion of the cliff walls, in the crevices and
caves and within the same small extent of rock face, pseudo corals and
all species of Mediterranean sponges can be found in a distracting
variety and abundance. All together they create an ideal habitat for
nudibranchs, moray eels, scorpion fish, blennies, gobies, wrasses,
starfish and many more. Divers return again and again to capture
colorful images one can hardly believe that belong in the
Mediterranean and often witness schools of amberjacks hunting small
fish, whilst a Triton’s trumpet or a Slipper lobster are anything but
a rare sight.

The average depth of the dive is 9 m, while the max is 19 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 24-26 °C
in summer months. Usually no surface currents are present. Boat ride
duration 5′.

5) Cape Kapros

Cape Kapros marks the northern tip of Skala’s coastline, and just
around it one is at the doorstep of Kefalonia-Ithaca channel. The
water movement and the occasional currents around the cape is as
intriguing, and create a habitat for huge noble pen shells (fan
mussels), nudibranch species on the bottom, whilst schools of bogues,
picarels and damselfish feed against the current, just above the
noticeable thermocline and attract predators like red snappers and
amberjacks. The cape has probably a turbulent past, as ancient
merchant vessel anchors and broken clay jars (“amphoras”) lie
scattered around.

The average depth of the dive is 12 m, while the max is 26 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 19-25 °C
in summer months. Occasionally a moderate surface current may be
encountered. Boat ride duration 7′.

6)Cape Kapros German Wreck

“At 13:30 in the afternoon, five English planes and one American,
flying low, almost at sea level, made their appearance. A caique had
left Zakynthos. Strafed from above, the caique caught fire. The
Italians immediately came on board our caique and asked us to head for
the wreck in order to collect the shipwreck survivors”.

This is what Captain Houmas, an agent of the Greek branch of MI9 that
helped the sole survivor or HMS Perseus John Capes in his escape from
Kefalonia, logged on May 23, 1943, referring to the commandeered by
Germans vessel that lies at -39 m just off Cape Kapros in Skala,
south-east Kefalonia.

Divers approaching the wreck encounter a pile of war supplies in the
shape of a vessel that its wooden parts have long rotted away, in a
dive into history for WWII enthusiasts. The main cargo of artillery
shells (apart from the ammunition and medical equipment) was most
probably destined for the coastal defense batteries of cape Mounda.
Among the 5‘’ cells, the cordite propellant, bullets and fuses boxes,
barrels and metal parts of the boat, numerous small crustaceans, fish
and other creatures, such as hermit crabs, shrimps, morays, saddled
seabreams, gobbies, tube worms and more, making the wreck a heaven for
macro u/w photographers. A large white grouper usually dominates the
wreck whilst red snappers often are preying in the cloud of damselfish
inhabiting this artificial reef.

The average depth or the dive is 38 m, while the max is 42 m, for
experienced and deep divers. The usual visibility is 20 m and
temperature ranges between 19-25 C in summer months. Occasionally
there might be medium currents. Boat ride duration 6’.

7) Snapper's Alley

On the eastern boundaries of Kakava reefs, before water depth drops
significantly, there is an area where Posidonia sea grass, rocks and
sandy patches alternate. This is the place where colourful wrasses,
brown meagres and all kinds of breams find shelter, whilst sea turtles
and eagle rays are common visitors, but without a doubt the stars are
the red snappers that are foraging around this alley, preying on
schools of damselfish and parrotfish. This is probably the site more
likely to spot a snapper especially from May to July, as they never
fail divers in early morning dives.

The average depth of the dive is 16 m, while the max is 22 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 23-25 °C
in summer months. Occasionally a weak surface current may be
encountered. Boat ride duration 7′.

8) Twelve Anchors

Located at the northern extents of the Kakava reefs, this site is the
most representative example of Mediterranean seafloor landscape and
biodiversity in shallow coastal waters and provides excellent chances
for u/w photographers. Collapsed caves and holes, along with meadows
of Posidonia sea grass create the perfect environment for parrotfish,
wrasses, gilt head breams, scorpion fish, young groupers and snappers.
Around the reef fragments of ancient clay jars (“amphoras”) can be
spotted, however the highlight of the site are the 12 enormous,
probably Byzantine era anchors, presumably ditched by a ship
struggling to escape crashing on the reef.

The average depth of the dive is 7 m, while the max is 12 m, suitable
for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 22-27 °C
in summer months. Occasionally a moderate surface current may be
encountered. Boat ride duration 5′.

9) Lighthouse

At the northern end of Skala beach, the rocky coastline provides an
u/w landscape of walls and rockslides, which create an ideal habitat
for most Mediterranean species. In this dive site, marked by the Cape
Kapros lighthouse, boulders scattered among Posidonia seagrass provide
a haven for all kinds of breams, wrasses, brown meagres and octopuses,
especially when water temperature is below 23 °C, up to the end of
June and again from early September. Huge schools of juvenile saddled
sea breams and damselfish, along with often passing Loggerheard sea
turtles, create scenery so rich that rarely can be matched by
Mediterranean waters.

The average depth of the dive is 8 m, while the max is 17 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 24-26 °C
in summer months. Occasionally a weak surface current may be
encountered. Boat ride duration 5′.

10) Gonies Cove

An impressive reef concludes in a wall at the tip of the cove. Divers
can observe remains of an ancient, roman era wreck that stretches
across the levels of the dive. Fragments of broken amphorae but also
an intact one, a lead stock of a composite anchor and ballast stones
mark the final resting place of the long gone vessel. The reef is
abundant with most species of Mediterranean aquatic life while
Loggerhead sea turtles are anything but a rare sight.

The average depth or the dive is 16 m, while the max is 31 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels. Boat ride duration 9′.

11) Luftwaffe Ju 88 Wreck

At the eastern, most tip of Ithaca, on the crest of a sloping reef
that shortly reaches the contour line of 100 meters, lies the aircraft
wreck of a Luftwaffe Ju88 twin-engine bomber. The aircraft met its
fate as it ditched a short distance offshore reportedly hit by allied
fire. It is shocking to imagine the force of the crash as the two
engines can be found far apart at 22 and 28 meters and the tail sits
at 36m further away. The fuselage and the wings have rolled deep down
the slope, off limits to recreational divers. Apart from the remains
of the plane, divers have the chance to explore the magnificent reef
where dolphins or large predators such as amberjacks, tunas and
snappers often feed on the clouds of sardines and damselfish, while on
the sides of the reef groupers ambush prey.

Quite often divers can catch the currents into a drift dive. Boat ride
duration 35′.

12) Ai Giannis' Wall

Off the cliff at Ithaca’s southeastern cape, a breathtaking wall rises
from the depth of 80 meters. Experienced and daring divers can explore
the holes and crevices to discover and photograph amazing colorful
sponges and corals, tiny crustaceans and nudibranchs, rare grouper
species, moray eels and lobsters. Often amberjacks and red snappers
appear from the deep to intercept the intruders of their territory.
The dive concludes on the shallower part of the wall, where impressive
rock formations can be observed. The Ai Giannis’ wall is an all-time
favorite site to free divers who can readily plunge into the deep blue.

The average depth of the dive is 20 m, while the max is 30 m,
appropriate for advanced level divers. The visibility is usually
greater than 30 m and temperature ranges between 17-25 °C in summer
months, depending on depth. Occasionally a weak surface current may be
encountered. Boat ride duration 35′.


13) Dias Rock

Dias is a rocky islet once home to a monastery and in earlier times a
temple dedicated to Greek God of Gods, Zeus. This is the dominant
landmark of an area of swallow reefs and some of the richest fishing
fields around Kefalonia.

It takes more than one dive around the rock to explore the cavelets
and passages that hold numerous species of fish, crustaceans and
cephalopods, while Loggerhead turtles are common visitors. Among the
stars are slipper lobsters and triton’s trumpets. Along the route
pottery and ceramics from the ancient and the Christian temples can be
spotted.

The average depth of the dive is 12 m, while the max is 22 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 23-25 °C
in summer months. Occasionally a weak surface current may be
encountered. Boat ride duration 35′.

14) The Eye

Around this shallow colorful reef, divers can spend time observing a
surprising variety of fish, since the holes and crevices on the rock
are home to parrotfish, cardinal fish, blennies, sea bream, mullets,
small crustaceans and many more species that find shelter there. An
arch-shaped swim-through along the coast can be crossed by divers
giving the opportunity to get impressive views of aquatic life against
the blue background, just like looking through a porthole on the
seafloor!

The average depth or the dive is 8 m, while the max is 12 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels.

The usual visibility is 20 m and temperature ranges between 22-27 °C
in summer months. No surface currents are present. Boat ride duration
3′.

15) Karavomilos Lake-Cave

As divers enter the idyllic fresh water lake they come across
impressive kelp-like sea grass and schools of sea bass and grey
mullets. Karavomilos is the estuary of the famous Melissani Lake and
the doorstep to an amazing world. The cave sets breathtaking scenery
of stalactites and stalagmites to the experienced divers. As soon as
technical cave divers enter the second chamber, light gives room to a
silent dark world.

The average depth of the dive is 9 m, while the max is 17 m, however
due to the cavern-cave characteristics, Karavomilos is reserved for
advanced divers and further penetration is permitted by technical cave
divers only. The visibility reaches an amazing 40+ m and temperature
is constantly 14 °C. No currents are present. Car ride duration 45′.

 

Offers

1
Recreational dive in Kefalonia

Two dives per day : One in the morning at 9:30, and one at 12:00 

Choose the dive you like either in the morning or in the afternoon 

The diving spot depends on the diving schedule and the weather condition

Activity requirements

Open Water or Advanced Open water required depending on the depth of each dive 

Special terms

Please note you are not allowed to fly for up to 24 hours after your last dive.

Do not forget to bring
  • Beachwear
  • Towels
Sport level:Advanced
Duration:3 hrs
Minimum Age:minimum 10 y/o
Meeting point:
Blue Manta Diving centre, Tara Beach, Skala 280 86, Greece
Included:
  • Water/ Coffee
  • Scuba gear
  • Photos & Videos
2
Wreck diving in Kefalonia

4 dives to complete over 2 or 4 days. 

Two dives per day : One in the morning at 9:30, and one at 12:00 

The 4 dives package offers divers the opportunity for a dive in the
past! There are some WWII and ancient wrecks of great interest around
Skala Kefalonia. There is a selection of dives among ancient and WWII
wrecks, depending on the level of divers and weather conditions. The
sites include HMS Perseus submarine, a WWII german ammunition carrier
small boat, a WWII Luftwaffe Ju 88 bomber airplane, a 2nd century BC
roman wreck and a 5th century BC classical era greek wreck. Divers can
join one or two dives in a day, on the sites available according to
their experience level and local diving conditions over a period of
2-4 days.

--- Dive sites description----

British Overseas Patrol submarine HMS/M Perseus, (N36)

Perhaps the top WW II wreck dive in Mediterranean and probably the top
submarine dive in the world, Perseus lies virtually intact on the
sandy bottom, at 52 meters depth, about a mile off the south coast of
Kefalonia.
Perseus submarine is not only among the most impressive wreck dives a
diver can experience, but has an amazing history as well. The vessel
was on combat patrol in December 1941, and while cruising at the
surface at night hit an Italian naval mine and sunk. From the crew of
59 only one, the Royal Navy leading stoker John Capes managed a
daredevil escape from a depth no one has attempted before, swam his
way to Katelios and with the aid of locals escaped capture from
Italian and German occupation forces and finally transferred in
Turkey. While legendary in Royal Navy, almost nobody believed his
adventure until in 1997 a team of Greek divers located the submarine
and verified details of his described escape.
The divers approaching the submarine encounter a magnificent vessel 88
meters long, with a large conning tower, the ship’s gun and the rear
hutch still open indicating the escape route of John Capes, while a
look in the interior is possible. Among other things, the torpedo
tubes and the ship’s propellers and rudder are visible.
The submarine is practically an artificial reef and colorful sponges,
small fish and aquatic creatures take shelter here, while predators
like amberjacks and snappers are frequent visitors.
The average depth or the dive is 40 m, while the max is 50, reserving
the submarine for experienced and technical divers. The visibility is
usually greater than 25m while temperature ranges between 18-24 C in
summer months, depending on depth. Occasionally there may be strong
currents close to the surface. Boat ride duration 15′.

Cape Kapros German Wreck

“At 13:30 in the afternoon, five English planes and one American,
flying low, almost at sea level, made their appearance. A caique had
left Zakynthos. Strafed from above, the caique caught fire. The
Italians immediately came on board our caique and asked us to head for
the wreck in order to collect the shipwreck survivors”.
This is what Captain Houmas, an agent of the Greek branch of MI9 that
helped the sole survivor or HMS Perseus John Capes in his escape from
Kefalonia, logged on May 23, 1943, referring to the commandeered by
Germans vessel that lies at -39 m just off Cape Kapros in Skala,
south-east Kefalonia.
Divers approaching the wreck encounter a pile of war supplies in the
shape of a vessel that its wooden parts have long rotted away, in a
dive into history for WWII enthusiasts. The main cargo of artillery
shells (apart from the ammunition and medical equipment) was most
probably destined for the coastal defense batteries of cape Mounda.
Among the 5‘’ cells, the cordite propellant, bullets and fuses boxes,
barrels and metal parts of the boat, numerous small crustaceans, fish
and other creatures, such as hermit crabs, shrimps, morays, saddled
seabreams, gobbies, tube worms and more, making the wreck a heaven for
macro u/w photographers. A large white grouper usually dominates the
wreck whilst red snappers often are preying in the cloud of damselfish
inhabiting this artificial reef. The average depth or the dive is 38
m, while the max is 42 m, for experienced and deep divers. The usual
visibility is 20 m and temperature ranges between 19-25 C in summer
months. Occasionally there might be medium currents. Boat ride
duration 6’.
Luftwaffe Ju 88 Wreck

At the easternmost tip of Ithaca, on the crest of a sloping reef that
shortly reaches the contour line of 100 meters, lies the aircraft
wreck of a Luftwaffe Ju88 twin-engine bomber. The aircraft met its
fate as it ditched a short distance offshore reportedly hit by allied
fire. It is shocking to imagine the force of the crash as the two
engines can be found far apart at 22 and 28 meters and the tail sits
at 36m further away. The fuselage and the wings have rolled deep down
the slope, off limits to recreational divers. Apart from the remains
of the plane, divers have the chance to explore the magnificent reef
where dolphins or large predators such as amberjacks, tunas and
snappers often feed on the clouds of sardines and damselfish, while on
the sides of the reef groupers ambush prey.
Quite often divers can catch the currents into a drift dive. Boat ride
duration 35′.

Kakava Amphora Yard

“Kakava” is an extended ancient wrecks site, once believed to be a
submerged village. There is an abundance of amphorae, primarily from
Roman era wrecks with at least one from 2nd century BC. Around the
reef more evidence of ancient to modern day wrecks are present, such
as steel ship parts and huge coal pieces, marking the resting place of
an unknown steamboat. Schools of damselfish hover against the current
attracting predators such as snappers, Mediterranean barracudas and
amberjacks. Parrotfish, brown meagres, groupers and octopuses occupy
every recess and crevice along the reef. The dive site is situated
between the two main nesting beaches for Loggerhead sea turtles around
Kefalonia “Kaminia” and “Skala”, so chances to catch sight of one
looking for her next meal, are quite high.
The average depth or the dive is 8 m, while the max is 12 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels.
The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 22-27 °C
in summer months. Occasionally a weak surface current may be
encountered. Boat ride duration 6′.

Tilemachos' Cave

Out of the seagrass meadows (“Posidonia oceanica”) a lone reef rises,
a death trap to ancient vessels passing through the area. At least 2
of those wooden merchant ships once roaming the Mediterranean, have
found their final resting place here, scattering their ballast stones,
lead and bronze parts of their hull and rigging and scores of amphorae
– their primary cargo, proving the area a puzzle to seamen through the
ages.
On the underside of a long shallow rocky ridge, a small yet impressive
underwater cave awaits to be explored. The dark chamber in the rock
features two side-openings and one on the top acting as a skylight
shedding ample light into the interior, rewarding the daring diver
with spectacular views. Also a variety of fish and quite often
Loggerhead sea turtles are frequent visitors to the site.
The average depth or the dive is 7 m, while the max is 12 m,
appropriate for divers of all levels.
The usual visibility is 25 m and temperature ranges between 22-27 °C
in summer months. Occasionally a weak surface current may be
encountered. Boat ride duration 5′.

Activity requirements

Open Water or Advanced Open water required depending on the depth of each dive 

Special terms

Please note you are not allowed to fly for up to 24 hours after your last dive.

Do not forget to bring
  • Beachwear
  • Towels
Sport level:Advanced
Duration:3 hrs
Minimum Age:minimum 10 y/o
Meeting point:
Blue Manta Diving centre, Tara Beach, Skala 280 86, Greece
Included:
  • Water/ Coffee
  • Scuba gear
  • Photos & Videos
  • Guided dives

Meeting point

Blue Manta Diving centre, Tara Beach, Skala 280 86, Greece Get directions
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