Best things to do in Gulen

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Calling all scuba divers! Come and explore Gulen, the only spot in the world which is home to the magnificent Periphylla jellyfish!

Looking for a Periphylla jellyfish has often been compared to looking for gold dust, almost impossible. This particular sea creature lives several hundreds or even thousands of meters deep in the open ocean and is seen on extremely rare occasions.

For those of you who are lucky enough to see it, will see it in the middle of the winter, in the middle of the night, in the middle of one particular fjord – that’s when the Periphylla come to the surface.

And Periphylla jellyfish and not the only exotic sea creature you can see at Gulen. Scuba divers can observe a large range of nudibranch and when we say large we mean large, you can see (approximately) 76 varieties of nudibranch at this Nordic spot. Most scuba diving centres in the area are specialists in underwater photography and happily share their experience, tips and advice with other budding photographers. The visibility is around 15-18 metres and in the winter months; December, January and February it increases to a maximum of 35 metres. Water temperature is highest in August with up to 22 °C and lowest in March with 6 °C.

The area of Gulen was of strategic importance during WWII. German fighters were stationed at Herdla, and when the allies managed to destroy the airport they were free to attack the ship traffic that went both north and south resulting in more than 25 vessels that you can dive to today. In addition, there are of course many great wrecks from the post-war period that are regularly explored.

The wrecks are protected in the fjords and easily accessible with good diving conditions. Currents cannot be compared to elsewhere in Europe, as there is almost no difference in tides. With more than 20 wrecks to choose from, you are promised good dives in almost all weather conditions.

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About

Calling all scuba divers! Come and explore Gulen, the only spot in the world which is home to the magnificent Periphylla jellyfish!

Looking for a Periphylla jellyfish has often been compared to looking for gold dust, almost impossible. This particular sea creature lives several hundreds or even thousands of meters deep in the open ocean and is seen on extremely rare occasions.

For those of you who are lucky enough to see it, will see it in the middle of the winter, in the middle of the night, in the middle of one particular fjord – that’s when the Periphylla come to the surface.

And Periphylla jellyfish and not the only exotic sea creature you can see at Gulen. Scuba divers can observe a large range of nudibranch and when we say large we mean large, you can see (approximately) 76 varieties of nudibranch at this Nordic spot. Most scuba diving centres in the area are specialists in underwater photography and happily share their experience, tips and advice with other budding photographers. The visibility is around 15-18 metres and in the winter months; December, January and February it increases to a maximum of 35 metres. Water temperature is highest in August with up to 22 °C and lowest in March with 6 °C.

The area of Gulen was of strategic importance during WWII. German fighters were stationed at Herdla, and when the allies managed to destroy the airport they were free to attack the ship traffic that went both north and south resulting in more than 25 vessels that you can dive to today. In addition, there are of course many great wrecks from the post-war period that are regularly explored.

The wrecks are protected in the fjords and easily accessible with good diving conditions. Currents cannot be compared to elsewhere in Europe, as there is almost no difference in tides. With more than 20 wrecks to choose from, you are promised good dives in almost all weather conditions.

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